skip to Main Content

Should Your Child Be Using Fluoride Toothpaste?

Untreated tooth decay in children is one of the most common conditions worldwide, which is why many toothpaste manufacturers have a wide range of toothpaste aimed at children, available in a variety of sweet flavours with cartoon characters all over the packaging. I wanted to write this post to give parents a little more information about toothpaste because it’s not really about the cute packaging and the taste test (agreed this does help make brushing teeth a lot easier).

Many parents, unfortunately, do not know the proper guidelines when choosing and using toothpaste in children. Majority of mothers start brushing their children’s teeth late, use adult toothpaste and have no idea about the clinical significance of fluoride. Most moms also use a full length of toothpaste on their children’s brushes.

HOW MUCH FLUORIDE IS ENOUGH?

Your body takes in fluoride by swallowing it in food and water. Fluoride occurs naturally in varying amounts in water sources and to a lesser degree in certain foods and drinks. Some countries also fluoridate their public water supply. Another way to take in fluoride is by topical application (in fluoridated toothpastes and mouthwashes). The fluoride taken in from foods and drink also provides some topical benefits when it becomes mixed with saliva.

We all know that brushing your teeth is vital in preventing tooth decay. It helps remove plaque, and the fluoride in toothpaste makes tooth enamel stronger, and more resistant to cavities. But how do you know which toothpaste to buy for your little ones when the amount of fluoride between brands ranges from zero to as high as that of adult toothpaste?

Fluoride in toothpaste is expressed as parts per million of fluoride (ppmF). According to the UK Department of Health, children under three years of age need to use a toothpaste with 1,000 ppmF. Older kids and adults need to use 1,450 ppmF. Young children need less fluoride to reduce the risk of fluorosis.

WHAT IS FLUOROSIS?

Fluorosis is the change of appearance of permanent teeth where they develop white lines or streaks. This happens when the developing teeth under the gums in younger children are exposed to excess fluoride. Too much fluoride affects the mineralisation of the teeth, and children younger than six years are at highest risk. The severity of Fluorosis is dose-dependent.

Image Source: health2blog.com

Fluorosis is a cosmetic condition and not a disease. It does not increase or decrease the risk of cavities. While the majority of cases of Fluorosis are mild, it can still have a significant psychological effect on your child.

HOW MUCH TOOTHPASTE IS ENOUGH?

It can be challenging to get your child to spit out the toothpaste after brushing without swallowing, especially if the toothpaste tastes like candy. It is therefore essential to use a small amount of toothpaste until your child has learnt to spit after they brush since inevitably your child will end up swallowing about half of what’s on the brush.

To prevent too much fluoride from being swallowed, you have to be vigilant about the amount you put on the brush. It is recommended that children under three years of age use no more fluoride toothpaste than a smear or the size of a grain of rice. For children three to six you should use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste.

Teach your child from an early age to spit. They don’t need to rinse. It’s also a good idea to not let them eat or drink anything after they have brushed their teeth so that the fluoride can do its job overnight.

KEY POINTS

  • Start brushing your baby’s teeth as soon as you see them come through.
  • Brush your child’s teeth morning and night with an age-appropriate brush.
  • Use fluoride toothpaste with the right amount of fluoride recommended for your child’s age. It is no longer recommended that children start using fluoride toothpaste only after the age of two.
  • Use the correct amount of toothpaste for your child’s age.
  • Children under six years of age should never use a fluoride mouthwash.

Fluoride toothpaste is generally safe and recommended for babies and young children provided you use it correctly. The most important thing you need to worry about is the amount of fluoride in the toothpaste. The next time you go out shopping for toothpaste take a look at the ppmF. You will be quite surprised since many of the “children’s” toothpastes have exactly the same amount of fluoride as adult toothpaste. Therefore it really only boils down to cost and taste and whether or not your little is a fan of Barbie.

How To Clean A Wound: The Controversy Of Antiseptics

What do you do when your little one scrapes their leg? Do you rush off to your medicine cupboard to grab your bottle of Dettol of Savlon? This may actually not be necessary. Whilst it’s important you clean a wound as soon as possible in order to reduce the risk of infection, what you clean it with has been an area of debate in the medical world for years. Research has shown that running tap water over a wounds is just as effictive in cleaning a wound. Antiseptics may actually damage the skin and slow down the healing process.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN ANTISEPTIC AND A DISINFECTANT?

A Biocide is the general term for a chemical agent that inactivates microorganisms and depending on their activity they can either inhibit the growth of, or kill microorganisms completely.

Both antiseptics and disinfectants inactivate microorganisms. These terms are often used interchangeably but there is a very big difference. Antiseptics are biocides that are used on living tissues and disinfectants are biocides used on inanimate objects or surfaces. So for example in your kitchen, you would use an antiseptic to wash your hands and a disinfectant to wash the countertops.

HOW SHOULD I CLEAN A WOUND?

Before you clean a wound you have to stop any bleeding. This is done by applying direct pressure. Of course the wound may still continue to bleed a little for a while and/or when you clean the wound it may start to bleed again. As long as the wound is not bleeding excessively you can proceed to clean it.

For most simple wounds I would simply recommend rinsing them under cool running water. In the ER and in theatre we always clean wounds with lots and lots of water. If you are out and about and don’t have running water, you can always use bottled water. If this weren’t available then I would rinse the wound with a diluted antiseptic such as cetrimide or povidine-iodine (if of course there are no known allergies). If you are going to use an antiseptic, use it only once to initially clean and never chronically. When you clean the wound again after a day or so use water. Don’t ever use rubbing alcohol or peroxide to clean an open wound.

You can gently rub off any foreign material using a piece of gauze soaked in water. Use tweezers to remove any debris that may still remain. Remember to disinfect the tweezers before use.

Once the wound is clean you can then apply a moist dressing. You can use petroleum jelly or what I love to use is a lanolin ointment such as a nipple cream. To find out more about moist healing you can read my previous blog: https://www.oneaid.co.za/picking-scabs-popping-blisters/

WHAT ABOUT ANTIBIOTIC CREAMS?

These include creams such as Supiroban, Fucidin and Neosporin. I do not recommend using an antibiotic cream for a simple wound. Most wounds heal very well on their own.

The problem with using these creams is the possibility of developing bacterial resistence. If the wound were to get infected later on and you have been applying an antibiotic cream since day one, this cream would not be very effective against the infection.

Technically you can develop resistence towards antiseptics but this is very unlikely since antiseptics have a broader spectrum of microorganisms they inactivate than antibiotic creams. If the wound was very contaminated and has a high chance of infection then I would rather apply a very thin layer of an antiseptic cream.

Newer research has found that the body’s surface actually supports wound healing on its own. We all have bacteria that live on our skins that cause us no harm. These bacteria help protect us from pathogens in the environment. Using creams and solutions that have antimicrobial activity will upset the balance of organisms on our skins and interfere with this defense system.

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OF AN INFECTED WOUND?

After you have cleaned the wound and applied a dressing it’s important to monitor the wound for any signs of infection over the next few days:

  • Swelling;
  • Redness;
  • Increasing pain;
  • Bad smell from the wound;
  • Warm skin around wound;
  • Wound is leaking pus; and/or
  • Body temperature > 38 degrees Celsius.

If you notice any of these above changes, go straight to the emergency room.

If you are anything like my mother you probably have very old big bottles of antiseptics lying around. One of my microbiology Professors at University once told us that microorganisms can grow on the surface of these antiseptic liquids after a while. Also the antiseptic components of these solutions deteriorate after some time so always check the expiry dates. Rather buy smaller bottles and don’t keep them too long after they have been opened.

RESOURCES

https://emj.bmj.com/content/19/6/556.1

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC88911/

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1743919117305368

https://www.woundsresearch.com/article/1585

https://www.woundsresearch.com/article/1586

https://www.woundsresearch.com/article/sams-dodd

https://mospace.umsystem.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10355/3613/DoTopicalAntibioticsImproveWound.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/45149036_Benefit_and_harm_of_iodine_in_wound_care_A_systematic_review

Tips For Choosing The Right High Chair

Before going out and buying a high chair it’s important to know the safety requirements. A US study found that more than 9 400 children, aging three years and younger, were treated each year for high chair related injuries in emergency rooms from 2003 to 2010. That’s one child every hour!

Nearly all of these injuries were as a result of a fall where the child either climbed in or out of the chair or stood in it. Majority of the injuries seen were head injuries (37%) then bumps and bruises (33%) followed by lacerations (19%). Most of us use our high chairs in the dining room or kitchen where the flooring is usually hard, so you can imagine the impact this has on a small brain.

This has prompted the US to update their safety standards (unfortunately there are no available statistics for South Africa). From mid-2019 all high chairs in the US will have to have a passive crotch restraint and a three-point restraint system, which means there has to be a fixed post that sits between a child’s legs and restraints that are fixed to the high chair in three different places. They found that children were able to slip out the bottom of a high chair and hope a fixed post will prevent this.

High chairs are not recommended for children younger than 6 months of age. A child is only ready for a chair once they have good head and neck control and are able to sit up on their own. If one is used too early a child could experience positional asphyxia. You may however, be able to start a little sooner with a reclining high chair (see my previous blog, ‘How safe is your car seat?’). https://www.oneaid.co.za/how-safe-is-your-car-seat/

CHOOSING THE RIGHT HIGH CHAIR

Framework: choose a high chair that is sturdy. Put some weight on it and see if it squeaks, deforms or moves or collapses.

Gaps: make sure there are no gaps your child can slip out of. Also check for gaps that little fingers can get caught in.

Harness: choose a high chair with either a three-point or five-point harness that includes a crotch strap or a post. The restraint should go over the shoulders, around the waist and if a five-point harness then between the legs.  

Wide base: a high chair becomes top heavy when your child is in. Choosing a chair with a wide base will make it more stable so that it does not tip easily.

Wheels: if you choose a high chair with wheels, make sure they can be locked when the chair is in use.

Folding locks: if the high chair folds check that the locks work well enough so that the chair cannot fall or collapse when in use.

Joints: choose a high chair with metal joints. These are stronger than plastic, which can crack after time.

Safety standards: make sure the high chair meets current safety standards and has been approved by an international safety authority.

BOOSTER SEATS AND HOOK-ON SEATS

Please be careful when you use these chairs. If not used correctly these seats can be dangerous.

Hook-on seat: These chairs are mounted directly onto a table and should only be used once your baby has good head and neck control and can sit upright. The mounts must be slip resistant and because this seat carries the entire weight of your baby the table has to be strong so that it does not tip over.

Booster seat: These seats are attached to normals chair by straps to raise a child’s height. They are usually used when a child has outgrown the high chair but is not quite tall enough to sit at the table unaided. They should also have straps to keep your child in the seat.

KEEPING YOUR CHILD SAFE IN A HIGH CHAIR

  • Never leave your child unsupervised when they are in a high chair.
  • Always use the safety straps when your child sits in the chair, even if only for a few minutes. The tray is not a restraint.
  • If the chair folds, make sure it is locked each time you set the chair up.
  • If the chair has wheels, make sure they are locked each time you set the chair up.
  • Never allow your child to stand in the high chair.
  • Do not place the high chair near a counter or table. Your child may be able to push against the surface and cause the chair to tip over.
  • Don’t allow older children to climb or play on the high chair while another child is seated in it because it could tip over.
  • Position the high chair at its lowest possible height if this is adjustable.
  • Make sure potential hazards such as hot food, drink and sharp cutlery are out of reach.

When choosing a high chair opt for an age-appropriate one with plenty of safety features. It’s also important to check often for recalls once you have purchased your chair. High chairs are commonly recalled because of their safety issues. Recent recalls include the Skip Hop Tuo convertible high chair and the Graco Table2Table 6-in-1. You can check http://www.recalls.gov to see if your high chair has been recalled.

RESOURCES

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0009922813510599

http:// https://www.nationwidechildrens.org/newsroom/news-releases/2013/12/new-study-finds-24-children-a-day-are-treated-in-us-emergency-departments-for-high-chair-related

How Safe Is Your Car Seat?

We all know how long it can take for a child to fall asleep. So when you reach your destination and your little one has finally fallen asleep you couldn’t feel more relieved. You wouldn’t dream of disturbing them by removing him or her from the car seat. Instead you do what is the most convenient, and move your child from your car into a pram chassis or straight into your home without ever moving them from the car seat.

Whilst car seats have saved many lives, they do have some hidden dangers. A study in 2015 found that out of all the sitting and carrying devices for young children, car seats were responsible for the most number of deaths. Hypoxia and suffocation from either poor positioning in the car seat or strangulation by the straps and buckles was the cause of death in all these cases.

HYPOXIA

This is when there is a loss of oxygen in the blood which reduces the amount of oxygen reaching the tissues. When there is an extreme loss of oxygen a child will suffocate.

The developing brain is very sensitive to a decrease in oxygen. Loss of oxygen can cause brain injury and result in a range of developmental problems as well as seizures.

POSITIONING

The position of your car seat is important. The Recline Angle of a rear-facing car seat is critical and an angle between 30-45o from the vertical is recommended. A recline angle more than 45o offers very little protection in the event of a crash.

A newborn or young infant’s head is heavy and the neck muscles are weak. If the recline angle becomes less and the car seat more upright, the head will flop down and obstruct the airway. A newborn should therefore be positioned in the lowest possible position, which still offers crash protection. As babies grow their neck muscles get stronger and the angle of the car seat can become more upright since their head and neck control improves.

 

The recline angle of a rear-facing car

 

A number of studies have looked at the level of oxygen in an infant’s blood whilst in their car seat. A level of oxygen less than 90% is considered dangerous. It was shown that children’s oxygen levels dropped as far down to 83.7% when in incorrectly positioned car seats. The authors also found that the longer the child remained in the car seat the lower the oxygen level would drop.

Another study found that a child in a correctly placed rear-facing car seat is still at risk of suffocation. The vibration produced by a car could cause newborns and young children’s head and shoulders to fall forward, despite correct use of the straps and buckles. This risk was also similar for both term and preterm infants.

Some specialists recommended that young babies spend no more than 30 minutes to an hour in a car seat at a time. If a long journey is unavoidable it may be wise for someone to sit in the back with your child to keep an eye out.

STRAPS AND BUCKLES

Always make sure your child is properly securely in a car seat. If the straps are too loose a child can easily slip or even wriggle down far enough to become strangled by the straps. If the child falls lower down in the seat the child may also suffocate from an obstructed airway if the head falls onto the chest.

NEVER

  • Never place your baby in a car seat on a soft surface such as a bed or couch. This type of surface could cause the recline angle to change resulting in your child’s head falling forward and obstructing the airway.
  • Never loosen or unbuckle any straps if you do decide to keep your baby in a car seat outside of the car. A child can wriggle and slip down far enough to be strangled by the straps and even fall out of the car seat altogether.
  • Never leave an infant or young child unsupervised in a car seat if they are asleep or even if they are awake.
  • Never place your baby in a car seat on an elevated surface such as a table. A baby can wriggle enough to cause the seat to move and fall off the surface.
  • Never place your baby in a car seat on the floor without looking at the recline angle. Some car seats may become more upright when placed on the floor.

Always make sure your car seat is installed correctly. Most car seats come with a built-in indicator that allows you to see if the seat is installed at the proper angle.

Read the manual carefully and if in doubt contact the local manufacturer or distributor. You can also contact Julie at Precious Cargo (www.preciouscargo.co.za) to book a professional car seat installation.

RESOURCES

Arya, R., Williams, G. and Kilonback, A. et al. (2017) Is the infant car seat challenge useful? A pilot study in a simulated moving vehicle. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed, [online] 102, pp. 136-141. Available from: https://fn.bmj.com/content/fetalneonatal/102/2/F136.full.pdf [Accessed 13 September 2018].

Batra, E.K., Midgett, J.D. and Rachel Y. Moon (2015) Hazards Associated with Sitting and Carrying Devices for Children Two Years and Younger. The Journal of Pediatrics, [online] 167, pp. 183-187. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.03.044 [Accessed 13 September 2018].

CPSBestPractice (2018). Rear-facing restraint recline angle. [image] Available at: https://sites.google.com/a/umich.edu/cpsbestpraci/resources/rear-facing-child-restraints [Accessed 14 Sep. 2018].

NHS (2016) Warning over babies sleeping in car seats. [online] Available from: https://www.nhs.uk/news/pregnancy-and-child/warning-over-babies-sleeping-in-car-seats/ [Accessed 13 September 2018].

Rholdon, R. (2017) Understanding the Risks Sitting and Carrying Devices Pose to Safe Infant Sleep. Nursing for Women’s Health, [online] 21 (3), pp. 225-230. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28599744 [Accessed 13 September 2018].

Does Your Child Need a Tetanus Shot or Not?

I’ve had parents often come into the emergency room after their child has taken a tumble asking for a Tetanus vaccine, which is why I felt the need to write a post explaining what Tetanus is and why we need to vaccinate our kids.

WHAT IS TETANUS?

Tetanus is a disease commonly known as lockjaw. It is caused by the bacteria, Clostridium tetani and can be fatal. The toxin from the bacteria affects the nervous system and causes severe painful muscle spasms, which can interfere with the ability to breathe. Currently there is no cure for Tetanus and treatment is mainly symptomatic until the effects of the toxin wear off. Complete recovery can take up to several months.

WHERE IS THE BACTERIA FOUND?

Clostridial spores can be found everywhere. They are found in soil, dust and animal faeces (including humans). Once the spores enter a wound they grow into mature bacteria, which produce the powerful toxin. Clostridium tetani is found worldwide.

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF TETANUS?

Signs and symptoms of tetanus can appear anytime from a few days to a few weeks from infection:

  • Spasms and stiffness of jaw muscles (hence the name lockjaw);
  • Spasms and stiffness of the neck muscles;
  • Difficulty swallowing;
  • Spasms and stiffness of other body muscles, commonly the abdominal muscles;
  • Other constitutional symptoms such as fever, sweating and palpitations.

TETANUS VACCINATION

I won’t go into too much detail regarding the various combination vaccines as there are many and every country has its own recommendations. A copy of the latest South African immunisation schedule can be downloaded from my resources page. The WHO recommends an initial 6-dose schedule to achieve tetanus immunity.

1. Primary vaccination

Three primary doses of the vaccine are recommended in childhood starting from 6 weeks.

2. Booster vaccination

Three booster doses are recommended prior to adolescence. Booster vaccines are then recommended every 10 years thereafter.

TETANUS-PRONE WOUND

  • This is any wound that has been contaminated with material that could contain tetanus spores;
  • This is any wound that is deep;
  • This is any wound that is dirty;
  • This is any wound that contains a foreign body.

Note: any wound can be tetanus-prone – cuts, scrapes, burns, animal (including human) and insect bites.

WHEN TO SEE A DOCTOR

It is recommended you see a doctor if:

  • Your child has a tetanus-prone wound and has not had a booster vaccine in the last 5 years;
  • Your child has a minor, clean wound and has not had a booster vaccine in the last 10 years;
  • Your child has a wound and you cannot remember when their last booster vaccine was.

RESOURCES

CDC (2018) Tetanus. [online]. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/tetanus.html#contraindications [Accessed 30 August 2018].

WHO (2018) Tetanus vaccines: WHO position paper, February 2017 – Recommendations. Vaccine. [online] 36 (25). Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.02.034 [Accessed 30 August 2018].

WHO (2018) Tetanus. [online]. http://www.who.int/ith/vaccines/tetanus/en/ [Accessed 30 August 2018].

Back To Top